Patient Information

Here you will find information on diseases that can be treated with JOTEC products.

The information on this website does not replace the personal advice by your doctor. Please always contact your doctor for further information on diagnosis and treatment.

Thoracic aortic aneurysm

An aneurysm is understood to be a pathological, localized, fusiform or saccular bulging or dilation of a blood vessel that develops as a result of congenital or acquired weaknesses or changes in the vessel wall.

The term "aneurysm" derives from the Ancient Greek word "aneúrysma", which literally translates to "dilation". Theoretically, all blood vessels can be affected by an aneurysm. In most cases, however, such a vascular dilation develops along the arteries, i.e. those blood vessels which transport oxygen-rich blood away from the heart to the organs, muscles and tissues of the body. An aneurysm is therefore also referred to as arterial dilation or arterial sacculation. Aneurysms occur only rarely in veins, i.e. those blood vessels that transport oxygen-poor blood to the heart.

Aneurysms that develop in the area of the thoracic aorta are referred to as thoracic aneurysms. They are considerably less common (approx. 5% of all aneurysms) than aneurysms in the abdominal area. They usually become apparent during routine examinations (thoracic x-ray) in the form of a widening. Once they reach a diameter of 5.5 cm, aneurysms in the thoracic area require treatment to prevent the occurrence of a rupture.

E-vita OPEN PLUS

The E-vita OPEN PLUS hybrid stent graft system allows a one-stage treatment of complex thoracic aortic diseases through the combination of surgical and endovascular treatment.

E-vita THORACIC 3G

E-vita THORACIC 3G is a third-generation stent graft system combining many years of experience with state-of-the-art technology to enable endovascular treatment of even difficult vascular anatomies.

Thoracic aortic dissection

The aorta consists of three layers:

  • Intima: Innermost layer of endothelium that lines the vessel.
  • Media: Central layer of smooth muscle cells, connective tissue cells, and elastic fibers.
  • Adventitia: Outer layer of connective tissue.

An aortic dissection occurs when the intima tears, causing the blood to flow into the media. Since the blood is under high pressure, long segments of the media split in longitudinal direction.

A dissection involves the formation of two functional vascular lumens: a "true" lumen, which is delimited by the normal intima, and a "false" lumen, which is delimited by the media and the adventitia.

The point where the intima originally tore is referred to as the entry. Through this entry, the blood first infiltrates the false lumen, which may lead to the displacement or complete relocation of the true lumen. In most cases, the intimal tube cannot withstand the pressure in the false lumen, resulting in additional tears distal to the entry, through which the blood flows back from the false lumen into the true lumen (re-entry).

E-vita OPEN PLUS

The E-vita OPEN PLUS hybrid stent graft system allows a one-stage treatment of complex thoracic aortic diseases through the combination of surgical and endovascular treatment.

E-vita THORACIC 3G

E-vita THORACIC 3G is a third-generation stent graft system combining many years of experience with state-of-the-art technology to enable endovascular treatment of even difficult vascular anatomies.

E-xl

The E-xl aortic stent was especially designed for the treatment of aortic lesions, particularly in cases of dissections or stenosis. The E-XL can ideally be applied in the scope of established endovascular therapies as well as a palliative therapy solution for Vena Cava Syndrome.

Abdominal aortic aneurysm

An aneurysm is understood to be a pathological, localized, fusiform or saccular bulging or dilation of a blood vessel that develops as a result of congenital or acquired weaknesses or changes in the vessel wall.

The term "aneurysm" derives from the Ancient Greek word "aneúrysma", which literally translates to "dilation". Theoretically, all blood vessels can be affected by an aneurysm. In most cases, however, such a vascular dilation develops along the arteries, i.e. those blood vessels which transport oxygen-rich blood away from the heart to the organs, muscles and tissues of the body. An aneurysm is therefore also referred to as arterial dilation or arterial sacculation. Aneurysms occur only rarely in veins, i.e. those blood vessels that transport oxygen-poor blood to the heart.

The abdominal aorta is affected most commonly (abdominal aortic aneurysm, abbreviated as AAA).

Why is an abdominal aortic aneurysm dangerous?

The main risk is a sudden rupture of the aneurysm, resulting in internal exsanguination. Other risks include the formation of blood clots in the aneurysm, resulting in acute vascular occlusion in the legs.

What causes an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)?

Most aneurysms are caused by vascular calcification (arteriosclerosis). Five in one hundred men above the age of 65 years suffer from a pathological dilation of the aorta, which needs to be monitored. Immediate treatment is required in one in one hundred patients! Active and former smokers are at particular risk; in addition, hereditary disposition plays a major role. Women are at lower risk, but should also undergo an examination if any risk factors are present (nicotine abuse, arteriosclerosis).

E-tegra

The E-tegra stent graft system enables the treatment of even difficult vascular anatomies and expands endovascular treatment options for infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms.

E-vita ABDOMINAL XT

E-vita ABDOMINAL XT is a proven stent graft system for the endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

E-liac

The E-liac stent graft makes endovascular treatment of both aorto-iliac and isolated iliac aneurysms possible.

Iliac artery aneurysm

This usually occurs in combination with an abdominal aortic aneurysm, may, however, also appear isolated. Formerly, iliac artery aneurysms extending beyond the bifurcation into the internal and external iliac arteries (iliac bifurcation) often necessitated open surgery in order to maintain the blood flow in the internal iliac arteries. Alternatively, a stent graft was introduced and the internal iliac artery was closed by means of metal spirals. Today, special, Y-shaped, iliac stent grafts are available, which are placed as part of a minimally invasive procedure to repair the aneurysm and maintain the blood circulation in the pelvis.

E-liac

The E-liac stent graft makes endovascular treatment of both aorto-iliac and isolated iliac aneurysms possible.

E-ventus BX

E-ventus BX is a balloon-expandable peripheral stent graft indicated for the endovascular treatment of renal and pelvic arteries in cases such as ruptures, dissections and aneurysms.